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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 75 (some duplicates have been removed)
is in decline. researchers at the australian institute of marine science say the reef has lost half of its coral cover over the past 27 years. there are multiple causes, including a destructive kind of starfish shown here. we look at what's behind it and what's at stake-- in australia and around the world-- with nancy knowlton, a coral reef biologist and a chair of marine science at the smithsonian national museum of natural history here in washington. welcome. >> thanks. how has all of this coral died off? do we know what's causing it? is it all that... >> it's not all the star fish. the star fish is about 42%. typhoons, big strong storms another 48% and then coral bleaching is the remaining 10% which is caused whenever the water gets too hot. >> ifill: so this is human causedded? >> yes. most of it is human caused. i mean a coral reef naturally goes through cycles of up and down. but it shouldn't be declining by half over course of 27 years. >> ifill: i feel like we have talked before about the declining coral cover. but not... but i'm wondering whether it's now picking up speed or whether thi
, first of all, the kind of science that you do for a living. you basically find out what we as people can handle when it comes to drama and exposure to these kind of horrifying, you know, events. there were crash test dummies in a lot of these seats. they were very expensive, weren't they? >> there are, about $150,000 uninstrumented. the data acquisition system needed to collect the data, all of that. we had probably at least, probably about 500,000 plus worth of instrumentation on that plane. >> you wanted to know every single ounce of data. every single knee that would get skinned on an airplane. >> exactly. because this isn't something we do every day. >> '84 was the last time you did it. >> we wanted to collect as much information as possible. and that was what was great about discovery. they allowed us to do that. they viewed this as a science experiment. >> now everybody wants to know where should i sit on an airplane? we've all heard the lore you'll die if you're in first class, you're better to be in the middle, no, the tail, then you see all of these different kind of crashes. >>
of the human mind would shock you. >> host: thank you so much. the secret science of winning campaigns is provocative and playing the groundwork for things to come. thank you for doing this. are you doing this going forward? >> i am reporting for slate. especially right teeing about the nuts and bolts. it is a fun time i will be out on election day. >> we will hear about it when the election is over. >> guest: thank you for having me. >> let me start tonight to ask you come at you focus on nine women per know-how do so let them? >> -- how did you select them? we could have done more but with the confine of the book you could only do so much. democrats, republicans, diff erent ages. we knew on the basis of nine you could not make generalizations that were 100% certain. conclusions were hypotheses that other people run with. in order to make that hypothesis we needed a diverse group. >> we also included women that was the white house project so several with men that the white house project identified olympia snowe, kathleen sebelius sebelius, they want to consider the notion with her
to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. c'mon0manp just do it,quick.ú no one's watchingp you0have to if you want to hang with0us ♪musicú the other one tooú good job >> welcome back. we continue with donald trump. i look at the world situation. you deal with the economy i look at the world burning in middle east and islamists and greece and spain and decline of the you euro. 16 trillion in debt. 6 trillion under obama alone. i am worried. i am really really worried about america and the future and lack of leadership at a very important time. what's your worst fear? >> i am worried also. that's one of the reasons i am so involved. i don't need to do this. i don't love doing it. you are a great friend and a friend of mine in the true sense. i would rather be doing other things right now. it's late. you work all day long. you come and shawn is going to interview. >> thanks a lot. >> the truth is or watching you because i always do. >> the truth is i am worried about this country. this country is going in the wr
unprepared we are. good to see you. hacking a computer isn't rocket science. getting to the level of the white house is noteworthy. >>guest: will, they went into the military office, that is the one responsible for keeping america's nuclear launch codes. they could compromise those, we would be in a real world of hurt. you are right, they have gotten so far. part of the reason is because attackers normally have an advantage. that element is, for years we have been afraid to acknowledge that the chinese have been behind unprecedented series of attacks not only for espionage but also to try all sorts of other things. if we are not willing to have the honest conversations with the chinese and with ourselves, of course we can't do very much to protect american networks. >>neil: but we are afraid of the chinese they own so much our debt. companies want to be often their good side and expanding to china, so, we just turn the other cheek? >>guest: we can't. this is now gotten to a whole new level. it is worrisome because of the nuclear launch codes and this is the president, the presiden
'm not going to stand for this. she's against everything we teach here. learning education science et cetera. all of a sudden, michele bachmann. oh no! i love it!
-2010 he served as chairman of the house committee on science and technology. he is working with the brookings institution to improve public sector leadership as part of the new initiative on improving leadership and management. bill kristol is the editor of "the weekly standard" which he founded in 1995. prior to that, he led the publican -- republican feature. he also has served as foreign policy adviser to senator john mccain. all of you see him regularly on fox news sunday and the fox news channel. i met him in 1981 when he was a very young assistant professor at the university of pennsylvania. the question that i would like to pose for each of you, and i will start with governor what does this through feel about the leadership styles of mitt romney and president obama? >> probably not much. >> ok, will this panel is over. [laughter] >> you could extrapolate a few things from president obama's first term that may be instructive. he is not the manager. he does out of a history of managing things. you bring in a lot of good, well trained people and give them tasks and try
, science, reading and so forth and don't want to take chinese and mandarin it is okay. do i get that right? >> absolutely, yes. it's okay. >> having heard that, what's your beef? >> my beef is less about, on that a particular point. if you actually read the governor's article it is well written. the last paragraph you have to embrace and love but it is the arrogance that somehow we, in government, are smart enough with our crystal ball to see what the future is. i remember in the '80s, when i was signing up for grad school they wanted me to speak japanese because remember in the '80s, the japanese economy was going to rule the world. it's trying to let government sort of choose winners and losers and predict the future. how do you do -- hopefully where the governor will actually go is providing to give the students the choice. >> i don't think it is actually picking winners or losers when you say this is a language spoken by a billion people around the world. people who speak japanese today, by the way, have a good leg up. it is still an important part of our global economy. >> governor, t
. dante scala is a professor of political science at the university of new hampshire, and "the washington post" deputy political editor, anne kornblut stuck around too. dante, you're on the ground there in the granite state. you're very familiar with that electorate. latest nbc news/marist poll, likely voters, president obama 51%, mitt romney 44%. what's the likelihood that the governor is able to close that gap between now and the first tuesday in november? >> i think it's going to take, craig, a national rebound for mitt romney to make it competitive here in new hampshire. there's no evidence that despite the fact that governor romney has campaigned in new hampshire off and on, really for most of the past decade, there's no evidence that he owns any kind of specific backyard advantage here in this new england state. his favorables to unfavorables are -- his unfavorables outweigh his favorables here in the state, which is striking given the amount of time he spent campaigning here. so new hampshire really is behaving the way it did four years ago, as a democratic-leaning bellwether state
and science teachers. we need that to move forward as a country. >> that's a total, though, right? >> educating -- training two million new workers in our community colleges in conjunction with business to fill jobs that are open right now. boosting american manufacturing by ending the tax break that sends jobs overseas and giving tax incentives to companies that start manufacturing businesses here. these are specific tangible proposals and, candy, i believe that they will pass because i believe the american people are supportive of that. >> but they haven't passed. >> it will be rendered on november 6 wrth. >> no, they haven't. >> for two years jobs -- >> some of the specific proposals haven't, but, candy, think about the logical extension of what you're saying. what you're saying is so we select the other guy because he will implement the proposals of the republican congress has pushed to cut taxes by $5 trillion skewed to the wealthy, can't pay for it. that will add burdens to the middle class to slash education, to slash research and development. >> i'm not suggesting -- >> he
. proposals in tv ads and on the stump like a million new manufacturing jobs, 100,000 new math and science teachers. feel mores a operational than an actual detailed plan. given the fact there's hunger for change, what change can the incumbent promise? the president has to come up with a good enough explanation of how reelecting him would break the partisan fever in washington. what does romney have to deal with? he hasn't differentiated from george bush's. and his plans lack specifics. in a one-on-one debate, candidates have a lot of control over how aggressive they are. both romney and the president are inexperienced in a one-on-one debate format. few details on the format. the president and romney will be at podiums, standing, not sitting, and there will be no basic time limits on their answers. it's not 90 seconds, buzzer, things like that. it's up to the discretion of the moderator, jim leierer. that's going to be up to him. but there's supposed to be a lot of leeway here over how long the conversations go. the debate is on domestic policy. 90 minutes is supposed to be devoted to the
of that is the president will also have to answer questions, how will he or 1,000 new science and math teachers been added to the rolls? how will 1 million more manufacturing jobs, that's cup one of the counter questions that the president will answer perhaps tonight as well. >> you could say the answer to that question was the americas jobs act stopped in congress and posed by republicans, which as you know, would have created almost 2 million jobs and by some estimates, would have created about 1.2% in gdp growth. so you can't separate the expectations of growth and jobs and so on away from the american jobs act. now, i know nobody wants to talk about that and treat it as if it is ancient history. the reality is that was the president's signature attempt to address these issues. teachers, firefighters. but it got nowhere. that doesn't mean he has not made a effort to put something together. he has. >> he will have the opportunity tonight to explain that as well as the republican opposition that he would face in the next term if he is elected. >> direct opposition. direct opposition from vice presidentia
results in just two days. the research was published in the journal, "science translational medicine." the paper reported the tests of just six newborns in neonatal units, but the implications could be widespread. roughly 20% of infant deaths in the u.s. are caused by inherited genetic conditions, according to the study. doctor stephen kingsmore led the research team at children's mercy hospitals in kansas city. he's the director for the center for pediatric genomic medicine there. dr. kingsmore, welcome, and thank you for being with us. first of all,-- >> thank you very much. >> warner: how big a breakthrough is this? >> this is a big breakthrough. we've been working toward this goal for a coup of years now. there has been a big gap between the knowledge that we have of genetic diseases, about 35% of them, and the ability for doctors to identify which of these was a problem in any given child with an illness. >> warner: and up until now, how much have you been able to diagnose the d.n.a. abnormalities? how quickly? i mean, i said it can take weeks and weeks, but what's the process t
, rational thought. the current party has waged a war in science. climate denial is horrifying. it's war on reason. you cited former vice president dick cheney that deficits do not matter. karl rove said it that we create our own realities. you live in it. a romney pollsters said we will not be restricted by fact checkers. i refer to a post-truth world. the problem is the policy oriented. the party has been captured by people like grover norquist who is a ferocious anti-tax ideologue who has forced many members of the house and senate to abide by his pledge of no tax increases. where do you get the revenue to help build the country? when people talk about the deficit -- it is not the deficit or debt but joblessness which is the great crisis of our times. the deficit and debt did not arrive from some inaccurate conception. -- immaculate conception. two unfunded wars, medicare part d. let them speak to that. mitt romney has it fantastical approach to arithmetic. at the bottom of it, there is a commitment and an ideology to insuring that the top 1% make out real well. those most vulnerable
stage? john gear is in the guest spot today. he chairs the political science department at vanderbilt university. how are you, sir? >> i'm fine. how are you? >> i'm good. i'm a person that believes that campaigns matter, that campaigning and governing are different jobs with different skill sets. can you talk about the impact of how campaigning is like governing and how campaigning is different than governing? >> there's certainly similari similariti similarities. when you're president of the united states, you need to do persuading. there are certain skill sets in common. one of the big differences when you campaign, you can be pretty vague and you can hedge. when you're governing, you have to make choices, and you've got to make decisions that have real policy implications. that's the big difference. >> can you name people who ran bad campaigns and were good presidents, and then people who ran good campaigns. >> i suspect the example of someone running a good campaign but not good as president might be lyndon johnson in '64. he ran a very powerful campaign and won 62%, 63% of the vo
in science or medicine and will now be relegated to quackery. >>> and everybody's talking about arnold schwarzenegger's new book and how he had an affair with more than just the housekeeper. he chieted with actress bridget nielsen while living with maria shriver. >> you don't feel bad about it, you just write it. >> actually, i did feel bad about it. but all my various things were just mistakes. you know, my failure, my screwups. >> was that the only affair? >> no. i had others. but, you know, that's something that's obviously between marie and me. >> and we will hear from him in our next half hour. speaking of arnold, if you read only one thing this morning, i highly recommend janet maslin's review of his book. an autobiography of someone as mast master conniver. one thing you can depend on is that these will come together. delicious and wholesome. some combinations were just meant to be. tomato soup from campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do. begins with back pain and a choice. take advil, and maybe have to take up to four in a day. or take aleve, which can relieve pain all day w
right by medical science, is really critical for achieving health and preventing these diseases. so the green new deal is a win/win win because it gets us to clean energy which can stop the climate crisis, jump start our economy, creating three times as many jobs as every dollar spent in the fossil fuel economy, and it puts us back to work. so it's a win/win win all around. host: dawn, joining us from oxford, alabama with dr. jill stein, last call. good morning to you. caller: good morning. i kind of agree with an awful lot of what you said about the cause of all this. but the one thing that you admitted and i'm cureuse about, what would -- kaoeurous about, what would make a banker with the subprime mortgage, what would make him -- which the whole goal is to make money, as much as he can, what would make a banker loan money to somebody that he knows was not going to be able to pay him back? and then do they just think -- get a meeting and say we're going to create these instances where we're going to loan money for people to buyouts, paopl that can't pay it back and sell it to someb
't mind sharing a little political science secret with you. although the debates routinely draw large viewing audiences, evidence shows that voters do learn a little bit of information from them, but political scientists also tend to agree that debates don't actually make a difference in the outcome. sorry. it's at least statistically true. most often, you can accurately predict where a race will end up after the debates by knowing where things stood before the debates. but don't tell the candidates. because with the first presidential debate coming up wednesday, governor romney and president obama will be gearing up for a fight. that's a good thing. we still need the debates. it's a so krat i can sem nor of sorts for the country having the candidates stand behind their podiums forced to answer for nair proposals. we get to see how the ideas stand up under questioning before you decide. at least for some of us, before we vote. here with me today is msnbc c contributor for the blog. latino.com's victoria did he francesco soto. she's a fellow at the university of texas. jam al simpsons
math and science teachers. part of his plan, i imagine welcome news to educators around the country. >> i think president obama's had a lot of great things about education. of course, he's been saying it for a long time. the importance from early childhood to graduating, increase the pell grants, change the loan programs so money doesn't go to the bank. it goes to kids to give them an opportunity to go to college. save 400,000 education jobs which keeps class size down. what amazed me most about the debate was i watched mitt romney, the master of etch-a-sketch. i mean will the real mitt romney please stand up? when i listen to him talk about education, i thought who is this guy? as governor, he cut education funding. they had teacher layoffs. he drove college class up immensely. he had tax breaks to the wealthiest. he supports the ryan budget which, if that goes through there will be $115 billion cut from education. he supports vouchers for private schools. he thinks kids should have all of the educa
was held up the wilson center in june on science and technology and innovation. the symposia, which the institute co-chairs foot china's state council, not only promote dialogue among the stakeholders but allow the participants to develop personal connections. the institute also recently released an initial report on u.s.-china security perceptions, and other big project we are working on with leading research institutions in the u.s. and beijing. just last month we published the u.s. cooperation and clean energy and the review of the difficulties both countries face in developing solar, wind and other alternative energy industries and the potential room for cooperation. last november, finally, henry participated in another one of our national conversations entitled afghanistan is there a regional and gamecocks the story on this is interesting. he resisted when he learned we get organized a brilliant panel of scholars and reporters to comment on his remarks to the and we hadn't cleared the names with him. he didn't know all the people, and he was not happy. but he gave brief remarks
in things like education, making sure that we are continuing to invest in basic science and research. >> guys, he was flat in the performance why? >> no teleprompter. really in >> absolutely. >> why else, tell me . >> no passion. >> explain that. >> he didn't have enthusiasm for what he was talking about and he didn't feel strongly. >> you guys agree with that? >> yes. >> he is contemplating a bit. he has his record that he can't talk about. >> he couldn't defend his record and he couldn't get near his record. so how could he defend it? >> why do you say that. >> romney had facts and statistics and obama had generalities of helping people and feeling good, but not the tools to implement what had to be done. >> i mean, romney didn't have that man facts but obama did. i will give you obama is tired and he's president and it is a rough time and he knows he's president. and he aged 10-20 years and he's doing. and give you a little lack of energy, when he's out there. >> all rightt for the record, ken. you have more energy that barack obama. now we are coming back to you a little laterr o
the most government funded research to push the boundaries of science and technology so our best innovators and the entrepreneurs could pluck them and start these companies. if you think about that is a formula for success, and education we now -- well, roughly 30% of high school students drop out of high school. we used to lead the world in college graduates coming out of high school. we no longer do that. on infrastructure, according to the american society of civil engineers we are now $2 trillion in deficit in terms of infrastructure. immigration we have a policy to get a great education and then get the hell out of our country. we are fighting on the simplest h-1b issues that are so vital for our future strength. fourth, the rules for incentivizing risk-taking and preventing recklessness. i don't think that we have in any way remedied that the way we want and on the government funded research if it looks like an ekg heading for a heart attack. i don't know if they are relative to what. all i know is in the things that have historically made us great, on each one of those i see us not g
cyber networks and systems safe. we have a strong science and technology directorate that has worked cooperatively to develop tests and transition deployable cyber solutions and technology. among its many projects, it is leading efforts to develop more secure internet protocol to protect consumers and industry. because each member of the public plays an important role in cyber security, which sponsored a campaign which is a year-round effort designed to engage and challenged americans to join the effort to practice and promote safe on-line practices. we want good cyber habits to be as ingrained and as familiar as putting on your seat belt. if you are not already a friend of the campaign, i encourage you to join today. in a few days, we will kick off national cyber security awareness month which is an opportunity each october to emphasize the culture of shared responsibility necessary to maintain a safe, secure, and resilient cyber environment. we must work internationally because the cyber criminals do not respect traditional national boundaries. attacks can and do to emanate from an
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 75 (some duplicates have been removed)